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Police Officers Trained to Teach T.E.A.M. in Michigan and North Carolina Schools

Contact: Sergeant Trudy Rampy, Prevention Services Section, (517) 333-4006

June 23, 2006
LANSING
.  Today, 24 law enforcement officers from Michigan and North Carolina received certification at the Michigan State Police (MSP) Training Academy to teach personal safety lessons in schools. 

The officers are graduates of the Teaching, Educating, And Mentoring (T.E.A.M.) School Liaison Project developed by the MSP Prevention Services Section.  T.E.A.M. is a proactive effort to make schools and communities safer by promoting an understanding of social rules, the consequences of unlawful behavior and students’ responsibilities as good citizens.  T.E.A.M. is not only taught in Michigan, but has also been implemented in some Pennsylvania schools.

“It is very rewarding to see the dedication and commitment these officers have shown to bring the important safety messages of T.E.A.M. to the children,” said First Lieutenant Phil Hart, commander of the MSP Prevention Services Section.  “The T.E.A.M. program is being actively presented in approximately 250 school districts.  It is the continued partnerships of schools, parents, communities and law enforcement agencies that helps to promote safety for all of our children.”

The T.E.A.M. training allows officers to teach at any of the three levels of education – elementary, middle or high school.  The elementary school curriculum teaches students basic safety rules such as bicycle and pedestrian safety, the proper use of 911, fire and gun prevention and being safe on the internet. 

The middle school curriculum is designed to improve the citizenship skills of students and provide an understanding of rules and laws in society.  It also teaches teens skills on how to recognize and be more aware of personal safety issues.  The curriculum also exposes students to the cause and effect of violence and teaches how to constructively handle conflict.

The high school curriculum provides a realistic picture of the roles and responsibilities of law enforcement officers.  It also educates students in the practical application of constitutional law and creates awareness regarding personal safety issues such as sexual harassment and bias-motivated violence (hate crimes).  The high school curriculum also provides a realistic look at what causes young people to get angry and then provides them with the skills necessary to resolve conflicts and develop good problem solving skills.

In 2005, a newly developed Family Preparedness/Homeland Security lesson was added to T.E.A.M. that teaches students, Kindergarten through 12th grade, the importance of being involved in their community and tells them how to prepare in advance for natural and manmade disasters.  It also encourages the students and their family to create a “go-kit” that contains necessary items for an emergency.      

The newest module, which is sponsored by DOW Automotive, is a defensive driving lesson for beginning drivers called “Arrive Alive.”  It is designed to provide students with a practical application and information on defensive driving.     

Graduating officers included:

Rank

First Name

Last Name

Department

Detective

Michael

Boczar

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Officer

Donald

Caldwell

Gastonia Police Department, North Carolina

Trooper

Paul

Campbell

Michigan State Police

Officer

Patrick

Daley

Gastonia Police Department, North Carolina

Officer

Gregory

DeGrand

Canton Township Police Department

Officer

Chris

Gerard

Meridian Township Police Department

Officer

James

Hamrick

Gaston County Police Department, North Carolina

Officer

Nicholas

Klaver

St. Johns Police Department

Deputy

Geoffrey

Kovenich

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Deputy

Mary

Linzie

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Officer

Damian

Manson

Lansing Police Department

Officer

Gary

Masseau

Lansing Police Department

Officer

Matthew

Meeuwsen

Grandville Police Department

Trooper

Brett

Nichols

Michigan State Police

Deputy

Tod

O’Lone

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Officer

Daniel

Osborne

Gaston County Police Department, North Carolina

Sergeant

John

Plath

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Trooper

Larry

Rothman

Michigan State Police

Trooper

John

Schneider

Michigan State Police

Deputy

Jeff

Smith

Monroe County Sheriff’s Office

Officer

Julie

Thomas

Lansing Police Department

Officer

Mark

VanPoppelen

Rochester Police Department

Officer

Charles

Walker

Harper Woods Police Department

Officer

Mark

Woliung

Rochester Police Department

 
Read more news releases from the Michigan State Police.

 

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